Wednesday, January 21, 2009

The Inauguration - Thinking of the People of Kenya

With a Masai

With Jane, our wonderful nanny. After we left Kenya, she got married and now has a family of her own - she named one of her daughters Laura as a tribute to my mum.

With Francis, and my sister

25 comments:

corine said...

How cool is this!

The Seeker said...

So nice and pretty pictures

xoxo

High Desert Diva said...

Love the photo with Masai

Mary-Laure said...

CORINE - VERY cool...

HIGH DESERT DIVA - it's very precious to me.

A World in a PAN said...

I often think of Jane, she was so wonderful!

jean-louis said...

Nous n'avons pas pu garde ce Masai qui venait d' Amboseli au pied du Kilimandjaro que j'avais engage comme watchman car avec les fleches empoisonnees de son arc il terrorisait notre cuisinier de la tribu Luo et Francis le jardinier Abaluya.Ne parlons pas de Jane qui venait de Kisumu sur le lac Victoria...

Sammi said...

beautiful pictures. it's nice to know that you've impacted on people's lives when they name their children after you.

Mary-Laure said...

SAMMI - yes, my family was very deeply moved when we found out that Jane had named her daughter after my mum.
Most of all, Jane impacted OUR lives by filling our early years in Kenya with so much love.

mansuetude said...

She looks wonderful. And Look at your wonderful hair. Alright, what was your dolls name? Were you afraid of the birds there?

Anonymous said...

AMAZING SHOTS!

Merruli said...

Absolutely beautiful pictures. Growing up in so many places must have been an amazing experience.

Belated congratulations to your blog!

Mary-Laure said...

MANSUETUDE - My hair was very much bleached by the African sun; it's darker now.
I can't remember the name of the doll, actually. I had another doll I loved, that was made in Kenya and was black. It was my favorite.
I can't remember being afraid of birds, but was warned to beware of the monkeys that would come to our garden to pick our avocados!

MERULI - yes, I was very lucky to grow up in so many places. It was very educational.

Rina said...

que fotos tan lindas y que lindos recuerdos!

Esti said...

no sólo me gustan las fotos con esas caras relucientes y diferentes, también me gustan esos colores desvaídos... :)

the traveler's soul said...

J'aime les couleurs passées
j'aime les sourires
j'aime la trace d'un bonheur partagé.

Anonymous said...

You truly have seen the world! You're so lucky, I am sure it has given you a different understanding of world issues, something we surely have lacked for the past 8 years.

limonana said...

charming photos...such a unique childhood memories i'm sure :o)

Anonymous said...

love love love your family photos!!! and love love love that you had/have such a interesting life!

nancyxx

littlebird said...

Wonderful images.

Mary-Laure said...

ESTI - si, los colores desvaidos dan una emocion muy linda.

ANONYMOUS - yes, I was TREMENDOUSLY lucky to see the world early on and meeting so many people from very different cultures.
Hopefully this new administration will bring us closer to the rest of the world instead of alienating everyone.

NANCY - thanks, I sometimes feel a bit shy about sharing such personal pics so it's great to know people like you enjoy them.

ALL THE BEST said...

What a wonderful day, a wonderful time in history, wonderful photos and of course wonderful memories! Thank you!
Best,
Ronda
xoxo

Joie de vivre said...

What beautiful photos.

Anonymous said...

to Mary-laure: un petit souvenir pour toi notre grand jardin 3 acres plein de jacaranda...etait envahi parfois tot le matin par des pilgrin monkey a barbe blanche qui volaient surtout des passion fruits ( pas des avocados ) qu'ils me lancaient si je sortais en poussant des cris stridants. Dans le Tsavo East les grands singes pouvaient lancer des pierres au lieu des passion fruit!

jennifer said...

How remarkable that must have been!

jennifer said...
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